Inspired by questions about life and relationships between the individuum and universal concepts, the renowned artist Regina Hübner creates enigmatic and poetic multiform pieces. Using different media, from experimental photography, video, sound, performance and installations, to texts, Hübner creates artworks connected to themes of perception, time and love, and realizes unique ambientations. Hübner aims at establishing theoretical elaboration through symposia with participants from the fields of hard science, art, psychology and philosophy, therefore proposing a complex and multiform body of work, which surprises by it’s criyptic substance and rich atmosphere.Her art highlights the reciprocal dependence and influence between the understanding of what we are and what we are not on a personal, social and cellular basis and whether strong parallelisms can be established between these different systems. Born in Austria, she lives in Villach and Rome, Italy.

 

She has had exhibitions at Nuit Blanche Paris 2018, Museum Moderner Kunst Kärnten, Klagenfurt am Wörthersee (Austria); Museo Laboratorio Arte Contemporanea dell’Università La Sapienza, Rome; ZKM Museum, Karlsruhe (Germany); Musée d’Art Contemporain, Bordeaux (France); The Claremont Gallery, Los Angeles among others.

Regina studied at the Academy of Fine Arts, Rome, Italy and The Higher Department of Art and Design Ortweinschule, Graz, Austria. She is Guest Researcher at IMéRA - Institut Méditerranéen de Recherches Avancées, Marseille (France) in 2019.

 

The video "happen and unhappen" (HD digital colour video, silenced ambient sound, 19’ 17” from 20') works as a Time translator on three different level. The first is lawyer is linked to the symbolic effect of the the gesture: salt, just like sand, slowly poured, just like in an hourglass. The second one relate to the intimate notion of time: the past being present in the video by the use of the old weighing scale which belonged to the artist’s grandmother and the third appears by the video treatment: the scene is shot as a sequence, without visible interruption.

For Hubner, this piece traces a highly personal memory and intimate notion of time: “Now, after a time of life, I put salt on that weighing scale, once to the right pan, once to the left pan.

There is no measuring, salt weights salt by itself. Yes, we cannot undo something we did, nothing can be unhappen, once it happened. But I invert the process, first the plates become empty and then they get full. It is a desire. As in life on our earth, it appears and disappears, what I do I cannot undo and equlibrium depends from a minimum.”